The Chronicles of Miss Shola

The blog's epitaph: Miss Shola came and went as she pleased

Archive for the ‘Art’ Category

32 today

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It’s time I get that portrait done before youth, that childhood friend, does its curtsy and leaves the stage forever.

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~ An original Anthony van Dyck from the Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna

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Written by Miss Shola

June 8, 2012 at 12:45 pm

Posted in Art, Ramblings

Pop art meets Monday morning

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~ End of Innocence by Romero Britto, a Brazilian Neo-pop artist. He combines influences from cubism with pop, to create a vibrant, iconic style that The New York Times describes, “exudes warmth, optimism and love”. Britto’s pop sensibility has since lent itself to many collaborations with such brands as Audi, Bentley, Disney, Technomarine, Evian and FIFA, for whom he created an official poster for the 2010 World Cup.

Written by Miss Shola

November 7, 2011 at 12:53 pm

Posted in Art

Move over mouse

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~ A young painter who liked art class in school but eventually gave up his easel and paintbrushes for the keyboard and mouse as the science of the binary code ensnared him.

Written by Miss Shola

September 1, 2011 at 12:14 pm

Posted in Art

Madhubani – more than just Art

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Originally, Madhubani painting was a folk art practiced by women of all castes, communities and religions in the Mithila region which is now a part of Bihar, North India. Also known as Mithila paintings the women folk painted it on the walls and floors of their homes, capturing the expressions of every day life. The paintings, made from natural and vegetable colours, reflected the relationship between nature, culture and human psyche.

The traditional Madhubani painting provided women with an art form through which they could express their desires, dreams and expectations as well as amuse and entertain themselves. In India today, women and especially girl children lack even such forms of expressions. Gender discrimination is widespread in rural and urban India alike. When aggravated, discrimination takes the ugly shape of female infanticide and foeticide, exploitation and abuse.

The painting above  is my first attempt at the Madhubani art form.

Both the painting and write-up are courtesy the DIY Educational Activity Kit provided by CRY.

Written by Miss Shola

August 15, 2011 at 4:41 pm

Posted in Art

Something I heard

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~ Francesco Clemente, an Italian painter, travelled through Afghanistan and India after completing his architectural studies in Rome. In 1970s he exhibited works that reflected his interest in the contemplative traditions of India. He currently lives in New York City.

Written by Miss Shola

June 30, 2011 at 10:38 am

Posted in Art

And the horse sped away…

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Maqbool Fida Husain popularly known as MF Husain, was a prominent Indian painter. According to Forbes magazine, he has been called the “Picasso of India”. Husain was associated with Indian modernism in the 1940s. After a long career, in 1996, controversy arose over paintings originally created in the 1970s which were interpreted as anti-Hindu. After legal cases and death threats in his home country, he was on a self imposed exile from 2006. In January, 2010, he was offered the citizenship of Qatar, which he accepted. He died in London today at the age of 95.

Written by Miss Shola

June 9, 2011 at 7:33 pm

Posted in Art

No Woman No Cry

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Chris Ofili is a British painter, now based in Trinidad, best known for artworks referencing aspects of his Nigerian heritage, particularly his incorporation of elephant dung. This painting No Woman No Cry stands on two dried, varnished lumps of elephant dung. A third is used as the pendant of the necklace.

It is a tribute to the London teenager Stephen Lawrence, who was stabbed to death in 1993 while waiting for a bus. After the initial investigation, five suspects were arrested but never convicted. It was suggested that the murder had a racist motive. In 1999, an inquiry examined the original Metropolitan police investigation and concluded that the force was “institutionally racist” and has been called ‘one of the most important moments in the modern history of criminal justice in Britain’.

The artist has painted a hidden message ‘Stephen Lawrence 1974 – 1993’ on the canvas in phosphorescent paint that can only be viewed in full in the dark.

Written by Miss Shola

May 24, 2011 at 4:21 pm

Posted in Art